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quarta-feira, 7 de março de 2018

Cirneco dell’Etna

The History of the Cirneco dell’Etna


The Cirneco (pronounced cheer-NAY-ko) dell’Etna, also known as the Sicilian Greyhound, may resemble a small Pharaoh Hound, but he’s a distinct breed of Italian origin, with his own color markings, tail shape, and triangle-shaped ears. He gets his name from Mount Etna, on the Italian island of Sicily, where his ancestors hunted rabbit and hare. He stalks silently — so much so that he can even sneak up on birds. Today, this rare breed is predominantly a family companion.
The Cirneco was recognized by the United Kennel Club in 2006. The breed is also part of the American Kennel Club’s Foundation Stock Service, the first step toward AKC recognition. In 2012, the Cirneco dell’Etna will be admitted to the AKC’s Miscellaneous Class.




Cirneco dell’Etna Temperament and Personality


The breed standard calls for the Cirneco to be alert and gentle, with an independent temperament. This curious and playful sighthound loves to be with people. He’s also smart and trainable, especially if you use such positive reinforcement techniques as praise, play, and treats. Although he’s small, the Cirneco is a hunter at heart. Always keep a tight hold on his leash — if he spots a squirrel, he’ll give chase. However, a stern tone of voice should be enough to bring him back to you.

Start training your puppy the day you bring him home. Even at eight weeks old, he is capable of soaking up everything you can teach him. Don’t wait until he is 6 months old to begin training or you will have a more headstrong dog to deal with. If possible, get him into puppy kindergarten class by the time he is 10 to 12 weeks old, and socialize, socialize, socialize. However, be aware that many puppy training classes require certain vaccines (like kennel cough) to be up to date, and many veterinarians recommend limited exposure to other dogs and public places until puppy vaccines (including rabies, distemper and parvovirus) have been completed. In lieu of formal training, you can begin training your puppy at home and socializing him among family and friends until puppy vaccines are completed.


What You Need to Know About Cirneco dell’Etna Health

Since there are so few of these dogs, little is known about the health of Cirnechi. In general, they appear to be a hardy breed, but they can get muscle and toe injuries while running. A reputable breeder will discuss potential health problems with you, including any conditions that she has noticed in her own lines.

Careful breeders screen their dogs for genetic disease, and only breed the best-looking specimens, but sometimes Mother Nature has other ideas and a puppy can develop a genetic condition. In most cases, he can still live a good life, thanks to advances in veterinary medicine. And remember that you have the power to protect your Cirneco from one of the most common health problems: obesity. Keeping him at an appropriate weight is a simple way to extend your Cirneco’s life.